25 May – 02 September 2007

TIMEOUT. Art and Sustainability

Kimsooja, Mandala, 2003Thomas Feuerstein, Manna-Machine, 2005Matt Mullican, Untitled (Computer project), 1988Lia Perjovschi, Museum of Knowledge (Diagram objects), 2007
Since the late 1960s it has become apparent that a number of artists have held increasingly skeptical views concerning the acceleration in Western societies. Exponents of Arte Povera, Concept Art and other groups have focused increasingly on the losses that have accompanied this continual acceleration in the pace of life.

Since the dawn of industrialization in the 18th century the pace of life in Western societies has continued to accelerate, both in societies as a whole and for individuals. At the same time, the last two decades have also seen the emergence of world views and movements warning against this growing acceleration in all walks of life and offering alternative models. Slow food, slow city, slow medicine, slow sex and the like are enjoying increased popularity in all areas of culture throughout the world. Moreover, trade and industry and politics have recently recognized the necessity of a sustainable approach.

Since the late 1960s it has become apparent that a number of artists have held increasingly skeptical views concerning the acceleration in Western societies. Exponents of Arte Povera, Concept Art and other groups have focused increasingly on the losses that have accompanied this continual acceleration in the pace of life. They have been questioning our notion of history, the effects our civilization has had on the environment, social cohesion – indeed, even the basis of our relationship with the world, for example, our sense of time.

The young generation of artists builds on the basics devised in the 1970s and, since around 1990, has been continuing to develop them on a rather pragmatic level somewhere between the poles of political commitment and withdrawals to the private and intimate sphere.

This exhibition "Timeout! Art and sustainability" illustrates the various ways in which art handles deceleration and sustainability. As part of an open narrative various topics and strategies are presented and confronted with one another. Artists presented: Lida Abdul, Giovanni Anselmo, Thom Barth, Michael Buthe, Thomas Feuerstein, Gloria Friedmann, Piero Gilardi, Henrik Håkansson, Laura Horelli, Jan Jedlicka, Kerstin Kartscher, On Kawara, Kimsooja, Matt Mullican, Lia Perjovschi, Dan Peterman, Clemens von Wedemeyer.

The exhibition is produced by the Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, curated by Friedemann Malsch. The Kunstmuseum St.Gallen is simultaneously showing an exhibition entitled "In The Eye of the storm" dealing with a very similar subject: slowness in contemporary art.
Feuerstein, Manna-Maschine, 2005_156x104.jpg
Thomas Feuerstein, Manna-Machine, 2005
Mullican, 6 Lightboxes, 1989_156x104.jpg
Matt Mullican, Untitled (Computer project), 1988
Perjovschi_MoN, diagram_objects, 2007_156x104.jpg
Lia Perjovschi, Museum of Knowledge (Diagram objects), 2007
Opening
 Thursday, 24 May 2007, 18 h  
Guided tour
 Sunday, 1 July 2007, 18 h with Friedemann Malsch 
 Thursday, 23 August 2007, 18 h with Christiane Meyer-Stoll 
 Thursday, 23 August 2007, 18 h with Kristin Schmidt 
Supporting events:
 Thursday, 21 June 2007, 18 h   Film

"Der Angriff der Gegenwart auf die übrige Zeit"

Direction and script: Alexander Kluge; Actors: Jutta Hoffmann, Armin Mueller-Stahl, Hans Michael Rehberg, Rosel Zech (1985, 113 Min.)

 Thursday, 28 June 2007, 18 h   Speech

Nachhaltiges Bauen - Die Avantgarde

von Dietrich Schwarz, Dioplom Architekt ETH/SIA, GAstprofessor an der Hochschule Liechtenstein und Geschäftsführer der GLASSX AG

 Thursday, 5 July 2007, 18 h   Special Event

When does tomorrow start? - Philosophising with children

with Eva Zoller Morf, philosopher and pedagogue

 Thursday, 30 August 2007, 18 h   Speech

To stay or to continue. Philosohic considerations

with Kai van Eikels, philosopher und theater scientist, Berlin